New Lecturers

Dear Computational Cell Biology Lecturers:

Thank you for participating in this year’s CSHL course on Computational Cell Biology.

Please take a moment to visit the CCB Course blog  https://cshlccb.wordpress.com/  and confirm the date, time, and topic of your lecture(s) by clicking on Course Schedule in the sidebar.  Materials that you would like to have available associated with your talks (e.g., lecture outline, presentation slides, homework assignments, papers) can be emailed to me at any time.

Lecturers that have a full morning or afternoon slot usually give two talks that are 1.25 hours long with a 0.5 hour break between them.  Please note that a minimum of 50% of your talk should be pedagogical in nature as opposed to an overview of your research.  You may find information that helps you “tune” your presentation by reviewing the lectures that precede yours.

The target students for the CCB course are graduate students in experimental biology laboratories interested in learning mathematical and computational aspects of cell biology.  While some students will have experience with mathematical modeling (e.g., by virtue of a math or physics background), your lecture should be designed for  biologists who are learning computational approaches for the first time.   If you have any questions about the course curriculum you may email me at greg@as.wm.edu or call 757-871-8638.

Information regarding travel to CSHL laboratory can be found at the Courses and Meetings web page http://meetings.cshl.edu/.  Andrea Stephenson <stephens@cshl.edu> and Maureen Morrow <morrow@cshl.edu> of the CSHL Course and Meetings Office can answer any questions you have about about travel and reimbursement.

The last few days of the CSHL CCB course are largely devoted to individual or group work on student projects that are conceived during the courses second week.  During your visit please make yourself available to students who wish to discuss emerging project ideas.  We also welcome any guidance you can provide to students during the student project phase of the course.

—Gregory D. Smith